Media Stories

HEADLINE
MEDIA
DATE
EXCERPT
HEADLINELift barriers to accredit foreign-educated doctors quickly, report’s author urges
MEDIA
CBC
DATE
Mar 30, 2020
EXCERPT

The number of doctors available to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic could be increased if the government or regulatory bodies would cut red tape so foreign-educated doctors could get accredited more quickly, according to a report released Monday. >> Health care; COVID-19-related

HEADLINE
MEDIA
Reuters
DATE
Mar 25, 2020
EXCERPT

Five years ago the arrival of a wave of refugees caused much consternation and fueled support for Germany’s far-right. Now, the country is turning to its migrant community to plug an anticipated shortage of medical staff battling the coronavirus.. >> Health care; COVID-19-related.

HEADLINEWhy Women May Face a Greater Risk of Catching Coronavirus
MEDIA
New York Times
DATE
Mar 12, 2020
EXCERPT

Health experts worry that the roles women hold in society, such as nurses or caregivers, place them squarely in the virus’s path. >> COVID-19-related; women

HEADLINEToronto is facing a shortage of skilled workers. A North Carolina experiment may be the solution to bridging the talent gap
MEDIA
Toronto Star
DATE
Feb 03, 2020
EXCERPT

When immigrants arrive in Canada, there’s a reluctance — and sometimes outright refusal — to recognize their professional credentials and experience. Going back to school to get that degree from scratch is out of reach for many, in terms of both time and money. Jan De Silva, president and CEO of the Toronto Region Board of Trade suggested solution? A six-month set of refresher courses, followed by a co-op placement. >> Construction; Health care; IT (Information technology); Retail

HEADLINEAuto Draft
MEDIA
CNN
DATE
Oct 26, 2019
EXCERPT

I'm not this exceptional human being,' Ibrahim said. 'There are millions of refugees right now who are not being given the opportunities that I have been given. And if they were, they would do incredible things.' >> Health care; Women

HEADLINEAuto Draft
MEDIA
CBC
DATE
Sep 10, 2019
EXCERPT

The story of a newcomer doctor from Liberia saving a fellow passenger on a bus in Ottawa. Since arriving in Canada eight months ago, she has been trying to get accreditation to practice medicine here and become a permanent resident. Meanwhile, she's been volunteering to get her foot in the medical system in Canada. >> Health care

HEADLINE5 HIGH-PAYING ENTRY-LEVEL JOBS
MEDIA
VPI Working Solutions
DATE
Jul 22, 2019
EXCERPT

Everyone has to start somewhere. But just because you're starting at the beginning doesn't mean you have to start at the bottom–at least in terms of pay. Entry-level jobs are the initial role that you take in a particular industry that will hopefully be the first of many in your career. And some entry-level jobs pay better than others. >> Accounting and finance; Health care; IT (Information technology); Sales and marketing

HEADLINESyrian surgeon working at hardware store despite N.S. doctor shortage
MEDIA
CTV
DATE
Apr 29, 2019
EXCERPT

As Nova Scotia grapples with a doctor shortage that has been described as a crisis, a group of trained doctors are wishing they were able to help. Loai Al Rifai is one of them. He completed his medical degree in 2009 and spent two-and-a-half years working as an orthopedic surgeon in his native Syria. When he left Syria due to the civil war, he spent three years practising medicine in Jordan. >> Health care

HEADLINEAuto Draft
MEDIA
Halifax Chronicle Herald
DATE
Apr 28, 2019
EXCERPT

Since moving to Canada, A Syrian doctor fleeing the war has gone from writing medical prescriptions to loading furniture into people's cars. Immigrant and refugee doctors have to go through a long, complicated and expensive process to get licenced in Nova Scotia. >> Health care

HEADLINESettled in a strange land: What life is like in Canada for Syrian refugees
MEDIA
Toronto Star
DATE
Feb 08, 2019
EXCERPT

The Star spent four months talking to dozens of settlement workers and Syrian refugees, who described ongoing language barriers and mental health struggles, as well as child-care, employment and housing woes. With a $1-billion price tag, there is a dearth of comprehensive data to show whether resettlement has been the unprecedented success the government says it is.